A Mini-Post

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It is already Sunday, and my normal Sunday post is nowhere to be found. I apologize for those who were waiting. What happened is that I had a new post ready to go, but at the last minute decided that I need to hold it back for the book I am working on. (Teaser)

Instead, I offer a mini-post focusing on some of Elder Richard G. Scott’s teachings. Here we go:

“You are here on earth for a divine purpose. It is not to be endlessly entertained or to be constantly in full pursuit of pleasure.” (link)

To put this quote in context, it was given in 1996, well before the advent of Netflix and Facebook.

He continues:

“You are here to be tried, to prove yourself so that you can receive the additional blessings God has for you. The tempering effect of patience is required. Some blessings will be delivered here in this life; others will come beyond the veil. The Lord is intent on your personal growth and development. That progress is accelerated when you willingly allow Him to lead you through every growth experience you encounter, whether initially it be to your individual liking or not.

When you trust in the Lord, when you are willing to let your heart and your mind be centered in His will, when you ask to be led by the Spirit to do His will, you are assured of the greatest happiness along the way and the most fulfilling attainment from this mortal experience. If you question everything you are asked to do, or dig in your heels at every unpleasant challenge, you make it harder for the Lord to bless you.” (link) (Italics added for emphasis)

I figure that is enough to chew on that you won’t even notice that I skipped a week.

Have a lovely Sabbath, my friends.

3 COMMENTS

  1. I was just talking about this last night with my SIL. Thank you for these words from Elder Scott. Very needful. Great timing!

  2. “If you question everything you are asked to do, or dig in your heels at every unpleasant challenge, you make it harder for the Lord to bless you.” Reminds me of the talk by Elder Christofferson in April 2011 “Whom I Love, I Rebuke and Chasten” In in he quotes Paul V. Johnson “We must be careful that we don’t resent the very things that help us put on the divine nature.” Something I wish I had done when I was faced with a church responsibility that was overwhelming and discouraging. I chose to let myself be discouraged instead of allowing the Lord to bless me in the trial.

    I’ve learned since then and am experiencing a difficult and ongoing trial now, and I am grateful for it. Not for what it can teach me, but just that I have been allowed to have the opportunity to endure this one well. I’m also grateful for second chances!

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